Friday, September 19, 2008

"I Need New Boots" to "I Need New Tractor Tires"

I was out working on the tractor tonight (I had a chance to do that because we shot the texture today so I had a break while it is drying) and I noticed what pitiful shape my rear tires are in (front ones also I guess...). They are cracked, balding, and at the moment a little low on air. All of those things add up to very little traction and don't give me much hope for pushing a little snow this winter. So, I think I have decided that I need to break down and buy new tires.

And as I approach the two year anniversary of this blog this is a subtle reminder of just how far we have come ... My second post way back on September 28th, 2006 was about boots and my need for a new pair. Now almost two years later I'm still wearing the same boots I bought after that blog post, but I'm also looking at buying some stinking expensive tractor tires. Oh, and I thought that I should add that I didn't receive any comments on that second post ... of course I'm not exactly sure anyone ever read it either :)

That is just a taste of the progress we have had in two years. In the next few days as The Beginning Farmer reaches it's two year anniversary I'm going to try and take a look back at how far we have come, but above all I want to thank all of you readers how have encouraged, enlightened, and taught me for quite a while now!

Now, I'm off to look for tires...

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Try a used set at a local tire shop. New front ones are about 50-80 a piece; new back ones can be 300-500 a piece.

Rich said...

About 4 or 5 years ago, we bought some tires for a couple of tractors from tiretown.com just outside of Kansas City (we just went and picked them up to save on the shipping).

At the time, it seemed like their prices were pretty reasonable, and they also sell used tires and blem tires if you are interested.

Anonymous said...

Try the NAPA dealer in Monroe, Hewletts. He has tons of tires and I have found he is usally the cheapest.

Jean said...

ooooh, look at all these pointenials of old tractor tires!!! First thought = SANDBOX. Second thought = raised garden beds.

Jack said...

Ethan, if the tires in the picture are yours I would keep them for awhile. Old tires are the best for mowing rough pastures etc. because the rubber is so hard it doesnt pick up things like new tires will. I would recommend picking up a set of tire chains for added traction on the snow pushing days. Hopefully tire prices will come down some next year???

Anonymous said...

If you need new rear tires for the traction to plow snow, can you get by another season using a pair of chains over the old tires? Chains cost less than new tires (this year) and may be needed even when you do get new tires.

Brian Julin-McCleary said...

What a cool freakin blog Ethan. I heard of this via my dad via Karl Gilbertson via M. Johnson's mom. Congrats man on running down the dream and nearly hitting two years on the blog. I look forward to reading more and getting to know what you have been up to. I'm in Corpus Christi, TX on a year internship toward my mdiv at Luther Seminary. Good luck with the tire discernment,
Brian
budmccleary@hotmail.com

Wayne said...

I agree with the previous poster. I thought the tires in the pictures looked pretty good. For snow you might find that running them softer helps with traction. I have a front blade and learned to just leave on the bushog for the weight.

Also when I was looking into new tires I found that alot of people on the ytmag.com forums like Tuckers Tires in Tennessee. They mostly sell on ebay: http://stores.ebay.com/TUCKER-TIRE-COMPANY

but I found that you can call them and they can find what you want. Including shipping they were still cheaper than anything local.

Ethan Book said...

Actually those aren't my tires ... I wish my were that good, but mine are more cracked, more bald, and the rims need some repair around the thingy (my mind is frazzled now).

Chains are in my future though I agree...

Rich said...

"...the rims need some repair around the thingy (my mind is frazzled now)..."

Are you talking about the valve stem hole?

It is relatively easy to fix rusted out valve stem holes (and a heck of a lot cheaper than buying a new wheel). First, you find a washer that has the proper size hole as a new valve stem hole. Next, do a little trimming and/or grinding to let the washer lay flat against the rim. Then, after a little welding, some grinding, possibly hammering, and some paint your wheel will be as good as new.

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